TMC History 1945-1954

1945

  • The Texas Medical Center is chartered under the laws of the State of Texas on October 20. The Board of Trustees holds its first meeting on December 11 at the Houston Club. Members include James Anderson, William B. Bates, Ernst W. Bertner, Ray Dudley, Frederick C. Elliot, John Freeman, Horace M. Wilkins, Hines Baker and Clinton S. Quin. During this meeting, Ernst William Bertner is elected President of Texas Medical Center, John H. Freeman is approved as temporary Chairman of the Board, and Leland Anderson is nominated and approved as the tenth trustee.
  • Ground breaking is held for the construction of Baylor University College of Medicine in the Texas Medical Center. Named the Cullen Building, it is the first facility in the Texas Medical Center.
  • The University of Texas System Board of Regents authorizes the creation of the School of Dental Hygiene as part of The University of Texas Dental Branch at Houston.

1946

  • Texas Medical Center adopts an official seal.
  • Texas Medical Center develops a Master Plan for the campus. A list of projects approved for inclusion in the Texas Medical Center include: Baylor University College of Medicine, M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research of The University of Texas, the School of Medicine Preceptoral Training Program, the Postgraduate and Graduate Schools of Medicine, the School of Dentistry, the College of Dental Nursing, the Postgraduate and Graduate School of Dentistry, the Institute of Orthodontics, the School of Public Health, the Institute of Geographic Medicine, Hermann Hospital, St. Luke's Hospital, The Methodist Hospital, Tuberculosis Hospital, The Arabia Temple Crippled Children's Hospital, and the Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library.
  • The United States Naval Hospital opens.
  • Hermann Hospital physicians perform the first cardiac catheterization in Texas.
  • Texas Medical Center forms a Flood Control Committee to work with governmental agencies on controlling Brays Bayou flooding.
  • Texas Medical Center’s Board approves, in principle, a plan to build a hospital and research institute for children on land in the Texas Medical Center.
  • Texas Medical Center’s Board grants non-exclusive utility easements along designated rights of way within Texas Medical Center.
  • Thomas Bate & Son is engaged to clear the right-of-way for Texas Medical Center.
  • Discussions regarding the paving of Fannin Street and other Texas Medical Center streets commence.

1947

  • The Texas State Legislature authorizes a School of Public Health within the University of Texas System (not implemented until 1967).
  • Texas Children’s Hospital Foundation is formed to develop plans and secure community support for a children’s hospital.
  • Texas Southern University opens its doors with the Law School, the Pharmacy School, the Vocational Division, and the College of Arts and Sciences. Beginning enrollment is 2,300.
  • (The Texas Southern University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences became a Texas Medical Center member institution in 2001).
  • Hermann Hospital performs the first “blue baby” operation outside of Johns Hopkins University.
  • Texas Medical Center Corporation establishes an Architectural Committee to maintain architectural controls over institutional projects taking place on Texas Medical Center property. For example, special permission is required for any proposed building higher than eight stories.
  • Legislative approval is received for the location of the following University of Texas institutions in the Texas Medical Center: M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research, School of Dentistry, School of Public Health and Geographic Medicine, Postgraduate Medical School and Preceptorial Training Center.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board of Trustees adds three associate, non-voting members. The new members include the Mayor of the City of Houston, the President of the Houston Chamber of Commerce and a Harris County Judge.
  • Plans begin for the building of a $500,000 Arabia Crippled Children’s Clinic in Hermann Hospital. (Now known as Shriners Hospitals for Children – Houston).
  • Construction begins on a new 400-bed Hermann Hospital and a 14-story Hermann Professional Building.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board approves signing an easement deed with the City of Houston to provide a major sanitary sewer trunk line through the Texas Medical Center.
  • Texas Medical Center President, E. W. Bertner, reports to the Board that per diem costs at Hermann Hospital are $13.00 per day.

1948

  • The Cullen Building, housing the new Baylor University College of Medicine, is dedicated.
  • The University of Houston establishes The College of Pharmacy.
  • Formal letters of intent to allocate building sites in the Texas Medical Center are sent to the following institutions: The University of Texas, The Methodist Hospital, St. Luke’s Hospital and Texas Children’s Foundation.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board approves a covenant that establishes property standards and restrictions as to use, ownership and improvements on land in the Texas Medical Center. (Such a covenant is still in effect today.)
  • Texas Medical Center Corporation revises its plot plan to provide St. Luke’s Hospital a new site adjacent to The Methodist Hospital. This revision allows the institutions to build and operate a joint power plant and laundry.Texas Medical Center Corporation holds a series of conferences with groups and individuals interested in establishing a central blood bank; an initial program begins with the Harris County Medical Society.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board approves the formation of a Professional Committee and an Institutional Committee.

1949

  • The United States Naval Hospital is renamed the United States Veterans Administration Hospital, and it becomes the first hospital to become a teaching facility for the Baylor University College of Medicine. (Now known as the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center.)
  • The Robertson Pavilion of the Hermann Hospital opens. It is reported to be the first air-conditioned major hospital in the United States.
  • The Hermann Professional Building opens.
  • Houston Academy of Medicine moves its medical library to the Texas Medical Center where it is consolidated with the Baylor College of Medicine Library. Houston Academy of Medicine-Texas Medical Center Library becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • Ground breaking is held for The Methodist Hospital.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board allocates approximately 9 acres of land to the City of Houston as a building site. Texas Medical Center also allocates the following acreage to institutions: (1) approximately 3.5 acres to the Houston Academy of Medicine as a building site for the Houston Academy of Medicine Library; (2) approximately 8 acres of land to the University of Houston as a building site for the College of Nursing, (3) approximately 17.5 acres of land to Baylor University, and (4) approximately 7 acres for the building of a Tuberculosis Hospital.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board authorizes a special committee to work with the Mayor of Houston and Harris County representatives in planning for the establishment of a new municipal charity hospital in the Texas Medical Center.
  • The street extending from the end of M. D. Anderson Boulevard to Holcombe Boulevard is designated Bertner Avenue; the street extending from Fannin Street to the front of the new Hermann Hospital is designated Ross Sterling Avenue.
  • The Texas Medical Center board approves a monthly publication to provide Texas Medical Center institutions with a medium for announcing their professional and academic activities. An estimated budget of $1,800 is approved for the first year. 

 

1950

  • The Methodist Hospital becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • The M.D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research of The University of Texas holds its ground breaking ceremony.
  • Leopold L. Meyer secures a $1 million commitment from James S. Abercrombie to build a hospital for children on the condition it will be “open to every sick or hurt child with no restrictions on religion, color or whether or not they can pay.”The boards of Texas Children’s Hospital and St. Luke’s Hospital sign a contract to construct adjoining buildings and operate under joint administration. This arrangement continues 35 years.
  • Upon the recommendation of Dr. Ernst W. Bertner, The Texas Medical Center Board adopts a 14 point policy to guide its efforts. For example, the Board is encouraged to study communication and transportation needs on campus and respond to those needs as institutions develop.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board approves the Norman Plan for the control of flood waters in Brays Bayous watershed, and a copy of the resolution is filed with the Army Corps of Engineers. The Norman Plan is expected to eliminate half of the water that empties into the Texas Medical Center from the watershed.
  • Upon the recommendation of Texas Medical Center’s Architectural Committee, Texas Medical Center’s Board approves final plans for the M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research, preliminary plans for the University of Texas School of Dentistry and the site development for the University of Texas projects.
  • Dr. Ernst W. Bertner, one of Texas Medical Center’s founders and its first President, dies.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board designates 13 acres of land as a building site for the City-County charitable hospital.
  • On the recommendation of Texas Medical Center’s Architectural Committee, the new Arabia Temple Crippled Children’s Clinic is approved.

1951

  • St. Luke’s Hospital becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • Texas Children’s Hospital becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • Ground breaking for Texas Children's Hospital is held.
  • Construction on St. Luke's Hospital begins.
  • The 300-bed Methodist Hospital building opens.
  • The Southwestern Poliomyelitis Respiratory Center opens in an annex to the county’s Jefferson Davis Hospital, the teaching hospital for Baylor College of Medicine, to care for those stricken in the polio epidemic that had swept the nation. Today, it is known as TIRR (The Institute for Rehabilitation and Research).
  • Approximately 6 acres of land is allocated to Texas Children’s Hospital as a building site.
  • The following names are adopted for streets within Texas Medical Center: Wilkins Street, Bates Street and Freeman Avenue.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board approves the employment of a maintenance man for the Texas Medical Center grounds at a salary of $30 a week.
  • The Houston Speech and Hearing Center is established in the Texas Medical Center.

1952

  • Frederick Elliot, Dean of the University of Texas School of Dentistry, assumes the position of Executive Director of Texas Medical Center. He serves in this position until 1962.
  • Houston Academy of Medicine becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • Arabia Temple Crippled Children’s Hospital becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • The University of Texas Dental Branch holds a ground breaking ceremony for its new facility.
  • Prairie View A&M University College of Nursing is approved to offer a collegiate nursing program.
  • The Arabia Temple Crippled Children's Clinic Building is dedicated.
  • Dr. Michael E. DeBakey performs the first successful resection and graft of the aorta at The Methodist Hospital.
  • Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital establish a teaching affiliation.
  • Texas Southern University graduates its first class of 13 students.
  • In view of the size and future expansion needs of the proposed Jefferson Davis Hospital, the Texas Medical Center Board approves an additional three stories in excess of the eight-story maximum adopted by the Board for Texas Medical Center structures.
  • The Texas Medical Center Board approves the final building plan and the plot plan for the Houston Academy of Medicine, Medical Library.
  • Mr. A. W. Kirkland, a Texas Medical Center Trustee, informs the Board that the daily working population of the Texas Medical Center, not including the Veterans Administration Hospital, exceeds 3,700 and is expected to exceed 5,000 by the end of 1953. He expresses concern that there is no bus service on Fannin Street at this time.
  • Third Street, just south of Baylor University, is renamed Moursund Avenue.
  • A new Texas Medical Center insignia is adopted to replace the seal approved in 1946. A special design, in keeping with the dignity and high aims of the Texas Medical Center was developed in cooperation with an artist and Mr. James Chillman, Director of the Museum of Fine Arts. This design represents the three phases of the Texas Medical Center mission – teaching, research and patient care. It includes the classical symbol of the book for teaching; the retort for research; and the rod of Aseculapius, the Greek god of medicine, as the symbol for patient care – all imposed upon the Texas star.

1953

  • W. Leland Anderson is elected President of Texas Medical Center. He serves as President until 1976.
  • The M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research of the University of Texas holds cornerstone ceremonies.
  • A Council of Administrators replaces Texas Medical Center’s Professional and Institutional Committees. The Council of Administrators consists of the administrators of each institution.
  • Horace Morse Wilkins, a primary organizer of Texas Medical Center and one of the original Trustees, passes away.

1954

  • Harris County Medical Society becomes a member institution of Texas Medical Center.
  • Texas Children's Hospital opens in a three-story, 106-bed building. Private rooms are $15 a day.
  • The Jesse H. Jones Library Building is completed.
  • St. Luke's Hospital, with 300 beds and 218 physicians, admits its first patient.
  • The M. D. Anderson Hospital for Cancer Research of the University of Texas dedicates its first facility, and a caravan of ambulances transfers 46 patients from the old Baker estate to the new hospital.
  • The Texas State Hospital Board approves a bill for the creation of the Houston State Psychiatric Institute.
  • Prentice-Hall, Inc. publishes a biography titled “Hugh Roy Cullen, a Story of American Opportunity” at a purchase price of $2.00 a copy. The Cullen family has made significant gifts to the institutions in the Texas Medical Center.
  • Texas Medical Center Corporation accepts a deed for approximately 2 acres of land from Baylor University College of Medicine. Texas Medical Center is authorized to deed this land to the City-County for a City-County Hospital.

TMC
Mission

 
Texas Medical Center strives to promote the highest quality health for all people by assisting member institutions achieve individual and collective goals of superior standards of patient and preventive care, research and education, and local, national, and international community well-being.