Texas Medical Center

A History of Innovation

89 Years Ago

Texas Medical Center took the first steps toward becoming the world’s largest medical complex. Since then, TMC has pioneered medical innovations bordering on the impossible. Many of these advancements continue to change people’s lives. This timeline celebrates our milestones and breakthroughs—and the profound impact they’ve made across the entire spectrum of patient care.

1920s

1925

Hermann Hospital opens to the public and admits first patient.1

1930s

1936

Monroe Anderson and trustees establish MD Anderson
Foundation with $300,000.

1940s

1942

University of Texas creates MD Anderson Hospital of Cancer and Research of the University of Texas, the first member institution of Texas Medical Center2

1943

City of Houston provides 134 acres next to Hermann Hospital to establish a hospital district.1
Baylor University College of Medicine moves from Dallas to Houston and becomes a member of Texas Medical Center.1

1950s

1950

Leopold Meyer starts building three-story, 106-bed Texas Children’s Hospital.2

1960s

1964

Dr. Michael DeBakey performs world’s first coronary artery bypass procedure at The Methodist Hospital.2

1968

Dr. Denton Cooley performs first successful heart transplant in the U.S. at Texas Heart Institute.2

1970s

1971

Texas Children’s Hospital collaborates with NASA to construct plastic isolator bubble for boy born with severe immune disorder.1

1976

Hermann Hospital launches Life Flight, the first private hospital air ambulance service.2

1980s
1990s

1991

Texas Heart Institute releases first patient in the world with an electric, portable, battery-powered heart pump.

2000s
2010s

2011

Researchers from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine discover a way to grow blood vessels and capillaries.

2012

Texas Children’s Hospital delivers Perkins sextuplets—the only surviving sextuplets in Texas—at 30 weeks.

2014

Over 150 member and community leaders gather to discuss the future of Texas Medical Center and position it as the world’s leader in life sciences.

1 Photo courtesy of Texas Medical Center.
2 Photo courtesy of the John P. McGovern Historical Collections and Research Center at the Texas Medical Center Library.